Wedding

5 Tips For Planning A Micro Wedding

tips for planning a microwedding

Small gathering limits this year have left engaged couples around the world wondering what to do next. Now that big parties are out of the picture, some of them are planning a micro wedding. Bigger than elopements, micro weddings keep the ceremony, white dress, sit-down dinner, dancing, and traditional aspects of a larger wedding but with fewer than 50 guests.

Before social distancing came around, micro weddings were already starting to trend. With less to co-ordinate, micro weddings give couples the opportunity to personalize their special day, spend less time planning, and save money.

As the old saying goes—good things come in small packages. Downsizing doesn't mean losing the glitz and glamour, in fact, it may allow you to do more with what you already have. If you're planning on making the switch to a micro wedding, consider these tips gathered from industry experts.

1. Get ready to let your loved ones know

Be confident in your decision and have an explanation for going small, especially if your family sways on the more traditional, conservative side. Share your wedding photos openly on social media, then send cards to friends and extended family. Once they all see how small your wedding was, they should understand why they weren't invited. 

2. Vendors may still charge standard wedding rates

Go through your contracts carefully but don't expect that all vendors will send you lower quotes because your wedding is smaller. Negotiate accordingly with wedding photographers if their regular packages are bigger than your wedding requires. Rideshare services might be more cost-effective than other rental services. Some cities are opening up special venues for micro weddings, such as Helena Gutteridge Plaza. Some wedding planners are coordinating specifically for micro weddings. Look around and weigh your options.

3. Make your day special & keep the celebration

Just because your wedding is smaller doesn't mean you have to skip the fun details! Hire a harpist, order an a-la-carte dinner from your favorite restaurant, designer cake, locally-grown flowers, special decor and memorable stationery. Sourcing local, organic, sustainable items is easier with a smaller wedding. Make your own favors for guests (it's much easier to DIY gifts for a smaller crew) or go with seed favors that grow into wildflowers. 

4. Have a coordinator, officiant, and registry

You'll still need help answering emails, moving people out of the rain, coordinating with venues, and making sure everything is fine while you're busy getting ready. Whether that's a trusted friend or maid of honor, assign someone else the coordinating duties. Also, remember to get your wedding license and find an officiant, so you have all your legalities covered. While you may not think of it with a small group, keep the wedding registry. You may be surprised by friends who still want to contribute even if they're not at the ceremony.

5. Take this opportunity to splurge, be flexible and creative

You're already stepping away from tradition by planning a micro wedding, so why stop there? Have your reception at an art gallery, with a picnic in the park, or on a campground. The same rule goes for your wedding attire—invest in a designer ballgown or walk down the aisle in a printed jumper. Book the open bar or bring the party to a mini-golf tournament. Whatever you didn't anticipate you could budget for with a large wedding, you may now be able to now with a smaller event.


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